Cross stitch calculator

This cross stitch calculator will come in handy if you wish to change fabric count for a design whether it is cross stitch or blackwork.

The more stitches per inch of fabric that there are, the smaller the finished design size will be. This can be confusing when you are new to counted needlework.

Let me give you an example:

My art deco lady, Pearl, is 115 stitches wide and 296 stitches high, making her 8.2 inches by 21.1 on 14 count Aida.

If you wanted to fit her into a smaller frame you may like to use the calculator to see if she would fit. By typing the stitch count in the boxes and then entering 16 stitches per inch we would see that this design would end up at just over 7 inches wide and 18.5 inches high if stitched on 16 count Aida.

Cross Stitch Calculator

Design Size:
squares per
Finished Design Size
inches wide by inches high.
cm wide by cm high.

Once you have worked out the design size, remember to allow enough fabric for framing. Adding 3 inches to each side of the design would be the minimum I would suggest. If you intend to use a wide matt or mount then even more would be a good idea.

I hope you find this service useful when deciding which fabric count to use. You might also like to view my embroidery fabric page, where I have answered a number of questions about fabric size for designs.



- - Cross Stitch Calculator

  


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