Repairing cut threads in hardanger

by Freda
(Durban South Africa)

I am busy embroidering a hardangar Tea with a beautiful border.

I cut 4 threads on the one side of pattern incorrectly. I used the same fabric threads to repair it. I did not remove the wrong threads but doubled the threads and secured it in the embroidery already done. I then had to weave the block of 4 threads that I had also cut. I then did the normal weaving over the threads.

Unless you know where to look you cannot see the problem.

What I want to know is, should I have removed the threads and laid the new threads again securing it. I could not weave them into the fabric as the pattern was already worked. Thank you for reading my problem. My e-mail address is freda.kapp123@gmail.com
Thanks

Freda

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Accidental cut thread to weave.
by: Andrea

I couldn't believe how easy it was to find your website. God bless you!!!!!! Yes, while doing Victoria's Wedding sampler...my first sampler, I was one thread short and accidently cut the wrong thread (after quadruple checking in addition to a long time Hardanger professional check). So cutting the wrong thread does happen. Having your two options of repair was soooo greatly appreciated. Thank you so much!!!!!!

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it happens to us all
by: Carol

Freda, I think everyone that has done any hardanger has at some point cut the wrong thread. I know I have!

There are two schools of thought when it comes to mending cutting errors.

Some embroiderers prefer to remove the cut thread completely and to reweave a thread from the edge of the fabric through the gap where the original thread once lay. This reduces any risk of the cut thread that remains in the project working loose and coming to the surface.

Others like to leave the cut thread in place, laying the new thread alongside it for a few inches in each direction, and then work over the top of both threads. It is believed that this makes the work stronger, but care does need to be taken when washing a hardanger piece repaired in this way. If the piece is to be framed then this is less of an issue.

It is also wise to keep in mind whether the thread(s) that were incorrectly cut need to have needleweaving or kloster blocks worked over them. If the latter, then I would definitely recommend removing the whole thread and replacing it. However, needleweaving can be worked a little tighter than normal (as there may be an extra thread to work over) which will help to disguise the extra bulk and to keep the cut threads secure.

I hope this has helped.

Regards,

Carol

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