cross stitch baby quilt

I am cross stitching a stamped baby quilt. How do I finish my threads and not show at the back of the quilt?

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2 methods
by: Melinda

I have finished two Dimension brand baby quilts and that company gives 2 options for cross stitching the quilt.

One is to go all the way through to the back leaving a 1 inch tail and cross stitching over the tail anchoring it. At the end run the floss through several stitches (on the back). With this method you have to put on a backing.

One person wrote asking how to keep the back from billowing since it will not be quilted. I had a design whose border design was in from the sides a few inches, so I machine stitched a line through the blanket inside the border all the way around. This left only a little center area to billow which wasn't a problem at all.

The other method is the hidden stitch method. According to Dimension you do not go through from the back. Knot your thread and start in from the front and then up several cross stitches away. Then cross stitch over the thread which is inside the blanket. The problem, of course, with this is that you can't see whether you are securing the thread or not. Then when you get to the knot, you clip it off close to the fabric. When getting to the end of the floss, you put your needle into the inside of the blanket and run it through several stitches (hoping you've actually achieved that).

I've done both- not sure which one is the best, though. The hidden stitch method was faster.

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backing a baby blanket
by: Anonymous

I want to back my cross stitch baby blanket with flannel. What is neatest way to do this? I was planning on wrapping material from back around to the front-stitch- and having a half inch border. Any better ideas?
elaine

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Backing of cross stitched baby blanket
by: Anonymous

I'm a little confused - after finishing cross stitched blanket, can I

1) put quilt batting material on the back
2) then on top sew receiving blanket
3) have ends sewn by sewing machine?

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knots in embroidery
by: Anonymous

Don't start your thread from the back of the quilt, instead pull it through the top, like when quilting or doing applique work. When the knot goes through, anchor it with thread again.

i don't know why companies just tell people not to put a knot in the piece, especiall a baby quilt. it will come out. Its the same thing with french knots...just make some xx's.

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Hold string in place with future string
by: Anonymous

I always end the cross stitch by going through the line twice and then I move the needle through a random point in the area. This way, when I continue on I will stitch and hold the previous string in with the current string.

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cross stitched baby quilt
by: Anonymous

Cross stitch baby quilt has no backing. Also, I needed to quilt the design after finishing cross stitching. Having a difficult time. Is there anybody who can finish this for me. I spent way too much time on this to not finish and I do not know how. Help. Thanks, Tamara

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baby quilt back
by: cindy

By stitching just around the edges and not requilting, what keeps the new backing from ballooning? I am going to attempt to use "stitch witchery" to apply new backing and then re-bind. Comments?

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CROSS STITCH BABY QUILT BACKING
by: Jan B

I've cross stitched 7 or 8 of these over the years and ALWAYS back them when I'm done with soft receiving blanket fabric, usually plain white.

Not only does the backing look classy & professional, it covers your stitches, adds warmth and weight to the quilt and helps it hold its shape.

Simply fit a piece of fabric on the back of the quilt allowing about and inch overlap over the quilt. Press under with steam iron to make a nice seam, pinning as you go along, then machine-stitch along the edge, wash, press and it's ready for baby. I spend a lot of time on these, hoping they'll become a well used keepsake, so finishing is important!

Jan

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cross stitch baby quilt
by: Anonymous

Thank you for your comment. This baby quilt has already a backing on it. I am using whats called hidden stith and trying to start and finish with a small knot. I don't know how to start or finish any other way without showing.

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cross stitch baby quilt
by: Anonymous

Thank you for your comment. This baby quilt has already a backing on it. I am using whats called hidden stith and trying to start and finish with a small knot. I don't know how to start or finish any other way without showing.

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baby quilt
by: Liz

surely if you are making a quilt you will have a backing to it, if so it doesn't matter if you thread into the back of the stitches as in cross stitch, if you are not putting a backing on it ( and if you are not you must be a very neat stitcher to get away with it) then perhaps a little glue, either way I would be interest to see how it turns out, but if you use it as a quilt cover, then again you could thread into the back of the stitches as no one would see.

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