stitching on linen

I just purchased a pattern that is calling for stitch on 32 count, (I don't know what that means) Misty blue linen.

I could not find this, so i purchased a linen premium fabric, antique white 27x36 32 count linen. (2 over 2).(I don't know what that means either.)

The design area is 16 by 16 and a quarter. Stitch count 255X 259. I am totally lost.

I have made a couple of baby quilts before. And it was a kit. That had the stencil on the blanket. now I am over my head, and would like to know if i can make this on another kind of fabric, that is easier to work with. I would really like to make this, because its very special for my daughter in law . So please help me. I am super LOST and don't know where or how to start. Thank you for your time.

Carol answers

The count of a fabric means how many threads to the inch it has. 32 count is really quite a high count, probably not the best option for a beginner. Worked over 2 threads it brings the count down to 16 (32 divided by 2), which is more manageable.

If the design uses only whole cross stitch and backstitch then you may be able to work it on a 16 count Aida instead. But if there are lots of fractional stitches or any areas where you are required to work over one fabric thread (which would give faces more detail, for example) then it is best to stick with the fabric suggested by the designer.

You can still make it easier on your eyes by working on, for example, a 28 count fabric. However, this will make the finished design size bigger, which in turn means you will need a larger piece of fabric to start with.

If you have never stitched on evenweave before, then you might find my page on counted cross stitch on linen useful.

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How to stitch on Dublin Linen

by Debbie
(Tonawanda)

I am an experienced cross stitcher, however, I have never stitched on linen fabric. I recently purchased a beautiful pattern that requires that I use 25 count dublin linen. The pattern is stitched over one thread instead of two.

My question is, when stitching, will my crosses have a thread in the middle of each one instead of a square. I'm a little confused about this. Any help with my question is greatly appreciated.

Debbie in Tonawanda.


Carol responds...

Yes, Debbie, you would have a fabric thread in the middle instead of a block. If you haven't stitched on evenweave or linen fabrics before you might find the following page on the site useful...

Counted cross stitch on linen and evenweave.

Regards,

Carol

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How to stitich on Dublin Linen
by: Valerie Kalyani

Yes, you will have a little '+' under your stitch, not a '#', if this makes sense! I recommend you stitch one over one, it is a lot less work.

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How to stitch on Dublin Linen
by: Anonymous

I would personally stitch it as PetitPoint. Its just half a cross stitch - looks like tapestry stitch it is straight stitch on the back and slanting on front as I said half cross stitch.

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Stitching over 2 on 32 count Belfast linen

by Pat Caiazzo
(Schenectady, NY USA)

What Does it mean to Stitch 2 over 2 on Belfast Linen 32 Ct?

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Belfast linen
by: Pat Caiazzo

I had to use a magnifing glass to sew the belfast linen because the holes were so small. Be very careful to get thread in the correct hole or it will throw your whole piece off. The first one I did on belfast linen came out beautiful, and the detailing is much sharper because you are able to do 1/2 stitch ( sewing by not skipping the holes) but alot more work than aida cloth. Very much worth the effort

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cross stitching on 32ct belfast linen
by: Laurie

Hi, I have purchase a piece of belfast linen instead of the usual stiffer Aida. I am now wondering if I should have used Aida as it is very difficult to see the squares. Is there a different way to cross stitch on belfast linen? I'd appreciated any help I can get. the pattern I have was stitched on 32 ct. belfast linen. Thanks...

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cross stitching over 2 threads
by: Carol

Hi,

This page will help you learn how to stitch over two threads on evenweave or linen fabrics.

The important thing is to start in the right place so that the stitches do not slip behind the fabric threads.

Hope it helps.

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Stitching over 2 on 32 count Belfast linen
by: Valerie Kalyani

That means that instead of stitching over one thread of the fabric, you stitch over two threads. You must work over two threads both horizontally as well as vertically to maintain a square stitch.
If you work over 1 one 32 ct. you would have a 32 stitches in one inch. If you work over 2 on 32 ct. you will ha16 stitches in one inch.

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Switching from aida for the first time to linen/evenweave!

by Vicky
(UK, Derbyshire.)

I have seen the difference in the result of a picture when it is worked on linen/evenweave as opposed to Aida. I have replaced my 14 count Aida with 28 count evenweave and the assistant said don't forget to sew over 2 boxes on the evenweave - rather than the 1 box on aida.

Simple I thought, except it doesn't look right. 2 boxes or 8 holes on the evenweave isn't square and looks funny! Have I got the wrong end of the stick? I understand the need to stitch over 2 otherwise my picture would be miniscule and I would have to reduce all the amount of strands I would use. But 8 holes on the evenweave looks more of an oblong shape so the stitch looks funny.

Cheers

Vicky

Carol replies...

Well done on leaving your comfort zone and trying out evenweave fabric, Vicky. I have to agree with you that the appearance of a cross stitch design worked on evenweave is much nicer than the blockiness of an Aida background.

As you have mentioned, a 28 count fabric, worked over 2 fabric strands, would result in the same sized finished project as 14 count Aida.

I have a page on the site here...

cross stitch on evenweave

...which shows diagrams of how to work over 2 fabric threads.

I think there is some confusion over the 8 holes.

If you stick your needle in any hole in your evenweave fabric and then look at all the holes that surround it, those are the 8 holes you will use for each stitch. So there is one directly above the hole your needle is in, one directly below, one to the left and one to the right. Diagonally you also have four corner holes. So four plus four equals eight. You are not counting eight holes in one straight line.

Your stitches should turn out square, just like they would if you stitched over an Aida block.

I hope this helps.

Regards,

Carol

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