how many strands of floss on 18 count fabric

by Mrs Thompson
(Coventry, West Midlands)

I have only done cross stitch on 14 and 26 count. I would like to try something on 18 count but am not sure how many threads I would have to use. Is it two like the 14 and 16 count?


Carol answers

There is a little table on the embroidery floss page that shows how many strands to use for different fabrics.

In the case of 18 count Aida I would suggest either 1 or 2 depending on how "heavy" or "solid" you want the finished piece to look. A single strand will result in a delicate piece of work, but you may prefer the more solid coverage from using 2 strands.

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Threads and fibres forum.

9 count aida

by tina
(cheshire)

how many strands would i use on 9 count aida, for cross stitch and back stitch?

Comments for 9 count aida

Average Rating starstarstarstarstar

Click here to add your own comments

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
9 count aida
by: Valerie Kalyani

You can use as many as you like; it depends on how dense you want the color to look. On a count that high, you could use all six! Experiment with a couple stitches using different numbers of threads to see the difference and choose the look you prefer.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Threads and fibres forum.

how many threads to use

I'm embroidering a dish towel, how many threads should I use? I will be doing stem stitches for most part.

Thanks

Comments for how many threads to use

Average Rating starstarstarstarstar

Click here to add your own comments

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
stem stitching
by: BJ Sewkrazzy

Actually I think it's a personal preference. Two stands will look nice and thin; my preference is three to get more of a 3-dimensional look. Try both and see which you like best!

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Threads and fibres forum.

two or three threads?

by Linda
(Ontario Canada)

Greetings from Canada!

I love stitching 16 and 18 count aida (14 is OK too) and I was wondering--on most x-stitch sites, it says to use 2 threads. However, I don't like seeing the background fabric through the stitches. I prefer my designs to look solid. If I do use three threads, will the fabric/floss contract in any way when I wash it?

Linda

Carol answers

There should not be any problems with using additional strands of thread, Linda. However, a design would end up using more thread, so if it is a kit there is the chance that you would run out if the designer only allowed for two strands.

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Threads and fibres forum.

what number of strands to use for embroidery

by Alishia
(Chicago)

How do I know how many strands to use when embroidering a pattern?

This is my first time doing this. I bought a cloth with a picture on it. It's the kind used to keep tortillas or cookies warm on a tray, and there isn't a thread count. I tried with one strand (but it took ages to finish one petal) then with six strands (now it looks bulky) but nothing looks right.

I'm sure most of the problem is my technique. I've ordered some books hat have not arrived yet, which brings me here.

Is there a standard amount of strands for flower petals? How many? The flowers are big. Thank you to anyone that can offer advice.


Carol answers....
For stamped embroidery (where the pattern is printed onto the fabric) you would normally use two or three strands of cotton in the needle at a time, Alishia.

One strand would be reserved for tiny detailed areas, whereas as six, straight of the skein, would be very chunky and not often used unless you are teaching needlework to children and using something like a binca fabric.

I made a little video showing how to separate the strands, which you can watch higher up my embroidery floss page.

The number of strands used would also depend on what stitches you are working. You mention that the flowers on your project are large, so I am thinking you would be filling them in rather than just outlining them. You could do this by working rows of chain stitch side by side, or by using a satin stitch or long and short stitch. Any of these could use 3 strands, which would make the stitching go a little quicker in larger areas.

I hope this has helped you. Enjoy your embroidery.

Regards,

Carol


Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Threads and fibres forum.

How many strands of floss do I use for hand embroidery?

by Kristine Swarts
(Las Vegas, NV)

How many strands of floss do I use for different stitches in hand embroidery?


Carol writes...

Oh Kristine, that is a difficult question to answer briefly! It can depend on the stitch, the project, the fabric being stitched on, many things in fact.

Generally, two or three strands are taken from the skein and used to stitch with.

For chunky work all six strands may be used, but that is relatively uncommon.

For very fine work a single strand of floss is threaded into the needle.

There are advantages to using an even number of strands, in that you can use the loop method of starting off.

Usually, an embroidery kit or pattern will tell you how many strands to use for each section of the piece. You may be told to use 2 strands for stems worked in stem stitch, and four for satin stitch flowers, for example.

I hope this helps.

Carol

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Threads and fibres forum.

  


Recent Articles

  1. Spring hoops, I like them

    Dec 05, 16 10:06 AM

    I like spring hoops because of the tension. I always put the hoop on a flat surface place the front of the fabric facing me because after I place the

    Read More

  2. Wallington Northumberland - a virtual tour of the needlework collection

    Nov 11, 16 12:46 PM

    Wallington Northumberland offers a feast for the eyes of any avid needleworker. Come for a virtual tour with me.

    Read More

  3. The History of Embroidery - part 1

    Nov 07, 16 11:17 AM

    The history of Embroidery from Anglo Saxon to the 20th Century

    Read More